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Amazon Marketplace
Last Post 21/12/2012 17:04:08 by NealCrowborough. 8 Replies.
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mglaunchbury@btopenworld.com
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Posts:3


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12/12/2012 14:24:01
    I'm happy to support the Amazon boycott but two points:

    1 You have suggested some alternatives for buying books. That's fine but remember that Amazon is also a place where small traders sell things through the market place. These are, I'm sure, legitimate people who pay their taxes so the question arise as to where they can sell alternatively. That's not so easy. The same applies to Ebay. I sell stuff on there and pay my taxes honestly. I don't see an equivalent at all to that.

    2. In your list of alternatives for buying books, you should consider The Book Depository, which is very good and has free postage.

    Michael L
    Rob Harrison
    ECRA STAFF
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:36


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    14/12/2012 00:27:52
    Hi Michael.
    Yes, this subject was been raised during the design of our campaign, and during a phone-in on Radio 4's You and Yours.
    To clarify, our boycott is of amazon products and does not extend to third parties selling on the amazon marketplace. These, after all, include such commendable organisations as Oxfam etc.
    We do however recommend trying to google the marketplace seller in order to buy from them direct. Some have their own retail sites and will be only too happy to cut out a tax-avoiding middleman.

    Regarding your second point, the Office of Fair Trading (sadly) approved the sale of The Book Depository to amazon in October 2011.
    EWalker
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    Posts:2


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    14/12/2012 16:06:14
    For books why not add Alibris www.alibris.co.uk
    <http://www.alibris.co.uk>

    Their website seems to provide all that Amazon does and it only uses
    independent booksellers.
    EWalker
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:2


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    14/12/2012 16:10:43
    Amazon take a commission of between 15% and 18% of the selling price of any goods sold on the Amazon marketplace and so that is a major source of income to Amazon.
    cpdharvey
    New Member
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    Posts:1


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    20/12/2012 10:40:15
    This campaign seems fundamentally misguided to me. As the House of Commons Committee found, Amazon (and the other companies called to give evidence) have done nothing illegal. By all means mount a campaign to require multinational companies to pay corporation tax in the UK on their activities and profits in the UK. But aim that campaign at the right target - those who make the laws that govern corporate taxation.

    I doubt that many people will understand the difference between buying from Amazon themselves and buying from the many thousands of tax-paying small traders who operate on the Amazon marketplace. Many of whom are people who turned to online trading after being made redundant or are otherwise unable to find employment. I can't see anyhting ethical in a campaign that puts such people back into the dole queue.

    One other point. The House of Commons inquiry looked only at corporation tax. What they didn't examine was the other ways in which multinational companies like Amazon contribute financially to the British economy. Through payment of wages (which are taxed), National Insurance contributions, business rates on their office and warehouses and myriad other ways. Could/should that contribution be increased through requiring them to pay more corporation tax ? Yes. So, change the law.

    carolchaplin
    New Member
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    Posts:2


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    20/12/2012 17:28:50
    have just mailed nectar who have amazon as one of their leading points to collect stores - what an impact that would be if they could join in!

    .... I followed your link in today's mailing to the list of your e shops but find to my dismay that you still have amazon listed. I wonder if you are aware of the recent boycott call on amazon - it is one of the best shopping sites to use and very efficient but their low prices are due in part to the fact that they pay very few UK taxes - I'm sure I don't have to tell you, its been on the news, but should you wish to make a more informed decision to remove them from your list until they can operate more fairly then such info can be found via ethical consumer who initiated the boycott http://www.ethicalconsumer.org/boyc...mazon.aspx

    I would use amazon for their efficiency and happily pay more if they were paying their fair share towards the economy of this country. it's ironic that those who suffer because of their unethical behaviour are probably among those taking advantage of their low prices and thereby exacerbating their own situation
    carolchaplin
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:2


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    20/12/2012 17:34:38
    you underestimate the calibre of EC readers. of course we can tell the difference between amazon and market traders and this point was also made in the copy that lauunched the campaign.

    and yes of course those to whom they pay wages then pay tax on them but that's hardly the same thing is it - everyone does that.

    I have used amazon this year only for 1 or 2 items that cannot be sourced in local shops and then only through traders.

    but I agree and I think you will find that all the major NGO's are working on changing the law - this is in their support.
    NealCrowborough
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    Posts:4


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    20/12/2012 18:55:03
    I'm not convinced by the argument that the boycott of Amazon is misguided. If it is carried out as recommended, i.e. search for the original supplier or manufacturer and order directly from them, it won't result in redundancies in innocent companies. Far from it, dealing directly with them gives them more profit (otherwise hived off by the middleman Amazon) and will improve job security! Of course we need to lobby the politicians to tighten the rules and/or change the law, though they seem to be much more concerned about going for softer targets (the so called benefit scroungers) who by comparison cost the exchequer peanuts compared with the likes of Starbucks and Amazon. As for the argument that Amazon contributes in other ways, well of course they do, but so does every other UK based employer - but they additionally pay the corporation tax that Amazon fiddles its accounts to avoid paying.

    I wonder if the submission came from a spokesman for Amazon - the arguments sound very much like those used by other tax dodgers.
    NealCrowborough
    New Member
    New Member
    Posts:4


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    21/12/2012 17:04:08
    Since posting my comments yesterday, I have tested out the boycotting strategy. On Dec 6th I ordered a present for my wife through Amazon, who assured me it would be delivered by Dec 13th, but nothing arrived. Repeated messages asking where it was were met with evasive replies asking me to wait another couple of days, but still nothing arrived and on Dec 20th they cancelled the order and refunded the money. They even had the temerity to ask me if was happy with the response I had had from their customer services! I immediately contacted the supplier directly, and their sales person found the last one in the warehouse, and with 20 minutes to spare arranged for a courier to pick it up. It was delivered 24 hours later, for the same price that I paid Amazon. So, for me the system works, and I won't be ordering anything from Amazon again.
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