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Supermarkets watchdog created

Nov 12

Written by:
12/11/2012 12:21  RssIcon

But needs power to fine - write to your MP

Earlier this year, after years of supermarkets using their power to exploit suppliers, the government finally agreed to introduce a supermarkets watchdog, the Groceries Code Adjudicator. This body will oversee a new code of practice.

The legislation represents a huge success for supermarket campaigners, both in getting government proposals into parliament and getting key measures included, like making sure trade unions can bring complaints, not just supplier bosses.

However, campaigners at War on Want say that "While the proposals are a huge step forwards, the bill risks setting up a watchdog that won’t be powerful enough to get supermarkets to change their ways, with only the power to ‘name and shame’ supermarkets, not to fine them. We know from our years of campaigning that exposing supermarkets abuses is not enough to make them change – only by affecting their profits by fining them can they be made to change."

So despite the progress, the government’s proposals don’t go far enough. Only by giving the watchdog the power to fine can supermarkets be made to change.

War on Want are asking consumers to writer to their MP asking that the legislation be given teeth.

You can email your MP direct from here.



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