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China accepts non-animal tests

Jul 1

Written by:
01/07/2014 14:28  RssIcon

From today, animal tests no longer legally required.

From 30 June, animal testing for ordinary cosmetics made and sold inside China, will no longer be legally required. Instead Chinese companies will have the option to use existing ingredient data and results of validated non-animal tests for the first time ever.

As China is the only country in the world to legally require that cosmetics be tested on animals, this is an historic rule change. It comes following two years of dedicated lobbying by the Be Cruelty-Free China campaign run by Humane Society International's (HSI) Beijing team and its Chinese animal group partners.

In recent years, many cosmetics companies have either withdrawn from selling in China or pledged to avoid the Chinese market, because animal testing contravenes their ethical policy. LUSH Fresh Handmade Cosmetics, Urban Decay, Nature's Gate, Paul Mitchell Systems, Pangea Organics and Dermalogica have all placed corporate and consumer opposition to animal testing ahead of potential Chinese profits.

HSI advises these companies to remain cautious. This rule change on June 30 is an important first step but cosmetics cruelty in China is by no means over yet. Cruelty-free companies should not rush to start selling in China believing they can now avoid animal testing because at the very least post-market surveillance - including animal testing - remains in place and HSI believes it will likely increase.

The next phase in HSI’s campaign is to see the rule change applied to foreign imported cosmetics too, as well as to end ad hoc post-market animal testing whereby cosmetics already on sale are chosen at random for extra testing.

 

Nominations are still open for this year's £250,000 alternatives to animal testing Lush Prize - nominate or enter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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