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EU grants temporary extension to glyphosate licence

Jul 4

Written by:
04/07/2016 10:36  RssIcon

Full ban delayed for another 18 months 


Glyphosate, the ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup weedkiller, was due to be banned in the EU from the end of June when its licence expires. But on June 29th, despite campaigners and the majority of EU member states voting against the licence, the EU commission decided to grant an extension to the licence for another 18 months.
 

Round up weedkiller

Photo credit: Global Justice Now



That's another 18 months of hundreds of thousands of tons of a ‘probably carcinogenic’ chemical being sprayed on our parks, our farms and in our gardens.


But according to Global Justice Now:

"Despite the fact that there isn’t yet an outright ban on glyphosate, this is still a victory for people power. Just a few months ago it looked very likely that there would be a 15 year relicensing of glyphosate with no restrictions, and many companies like Monsanto assumed that this would go ahead unchallenged.

This massive challenge to the greed of chemical and agribusiness companies has come from the millions of people who signed petitions calling for a ban, to the hundreds of people across the UK who put labels on Monsanto’s Roundup bottles in garden centres to expose the truth about glyphosate." 


Campaign labels

The spoof labels warn that the product is classified as ‘probably causing cancer’ and that Monsanto’s corporate control of agriculture ‘degrades farmers’ power’. People are being encouraged to wrap the labels around bottles of Roundup in garden centres across the country and share images on social media with the hashtag #MonsantoExposed.

 

Request your campaign pack of labels. 

 

Further reading: Monsanto: guardian of seeds or profits?


 

 

 

 


 

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