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A People’s Food Policy is launched

Aug 9

Written by:
09/08/2017 09:23  RssIcon

A progressive vision of food and farming for England post Brexit 

 

A coalition of grassroots food and farming organisations has launched ‘A People’s Food Policy’ outlining a progressive vision of food and farming for England post Brexit.

Image: Food PolicyWith Brexit negotiations creating huge uncertainty for the food and farming sector, the People’s Food Policy presents a way forward. 

It argues that the UK needs a more coordinated approach to our food systems.

A new food act could bring together currently fragmented government departments, that cover food production, health, labour rights, land use and planning, trade, the environment, democratic participation and community well being.

The ‘A People’s Food Policy’ draws on 18 months of extensive research with grassroots organisations, NGOs, trade unions, community projects, businesses and individuals, and presents a comprehensive proposal for a more just and sustainable food system in England.

It lists a set of policy proposals and describes a vision for sustainable food in the UK.


Heidi Chow, food campaigner for Global Justice Now says of the research:

“The new Environment Secretary, Michael Gove commented... that the UK can have both cheaper and higher quality food after Brexit. But the experience of many UK farmers and growers suggests that cheaper food prices must be paid for through lowering environmental and social standards across the farming sector.

Instead we need to see greater regulation of the food retail sector to ensure farmers everywhere are paid a fair price for their produce.’’

 

Food Sovereignty

The report consists of nine chapters themed around governance, food production, health, land, labour, environment, knowledge and skills, trade and finance. Each chapter contains a discussion and analysis of current governance structures, decision making processes and legislation in order to present a list of policy proposals which draw on two key frameworks: ‘the right to food’ and ‘food sovereignty’.

 

FarmStart

FarmStart. 

 

The right to food is considered a basic human right; with food being seen as a public good, and one that we should have the means to access at all times. 

 

Food sovereignty is defined as:

“The right of peoples to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods, and their right to define their own food and agriculture systems. It puts those who produce, process and consume healthy and local food at the heart of our agriculture and food systems, instead of the demands of market and transnational companies.” 

 

Dee Butterly, coordinator of A People’s Food Policy said:

“We now urge politicians to seriously consider this proposal for a progressive national food policy. One that supports a food system where everybody, regardless of income, status or background, has secure access to good food at all times, without compromising the wellbeing of people, the environment, and the ability of future generations to provide for themselves.”

 

Download the report from www.peoplesfoodpolicy.org 

 


 

 

 

 


 

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