In October 2018 Ethical Consumer viewed Google’s Environment Sustainability Report 2018.

The report included environmental information, and data on energy, waste, water, greenhouse gas emissions and toxics. Google was thus felt to have a reasonable understanding of its environmental impacts.

There were many targets in the report but all of them were either dated in the past, were vague and not quantified, or were for simply maintaining things at the current level.

Data for greenhouse gas emisssions for Scope 1-3 was said to be independently verified and a link was provided to a statement by Cameron Cole. However the rest of the report did not appear to be independently verified.

Overall Google received Ethical Consumer’s worst rating for environmental reporting.

Reference:

2018 report (22 October 2018)

On Tuesday 9 July 2013 it was reported on the Guardian website, www.theguardian.com, that Google had hosted a fundraiser for a US Senator, Republican Jim Inhofe, who was “the most notorious climate change denier in Congress”.
The article reported that it was the “second show of support from Google for the anti-climate cause in recent weeks”. The company was said to have donated $50,000 for a fundraising dinner for the ultra-conservative Competitive Enterprise Institute. The Competitive Enterprise Institute was said to have “launched multiple law suits aimed at trying to discredit the science behind climate change – accusing scientists of fraud. None have so far succeeded”.

Reference:

Google hosts fundraiser for climate change denying US senator (9 July 2013)

Ethical Consumer viewed the updated Greenpeace Report ‘Clicking Clean: who is winning the race to build a greener internet?’ dated January 2017.

The Clicking Clean reports benchmarks the IT sector, ranking IT companies on their use of renewable and dirty energy within their data centres. According to the 2017 report the IT sector was estimated to consume about 7% of the world’s global electricity and was predicted to increase threefold in global internet traffic by 2020, resulting in the internet's energy footprint rising further, fueled both by our individual consumption of data and by the spread of the digital age to more of the world's population.

Vevo received an ‘F’ grade in the 2017 Clicking Clean Report. The report stated "Vevo.com, a music video streaming service, appears to use both Rackspace and Amazon Web Services to host its content."
Energy Transparency: Vevo did not provide any information about its energy footprint.
Renewable Energy Commitment: Vevo had not set any renewable energy goals or adopted a long-term
commitment to be renewably powered.
Efficiency and GHG mitigation: Vevo had not provided any evidence about increased energy efficiency.
RE procurement: Vevo had not offered evidence of renewable energy procurement.
Advocacy: Vevo had not provided any evidence of renewable energy advocacy.

As a result of its rating it lost half a mark under Ethical Consumer's Climate Change category.

Reference:

Greenpeace Click Clean Report update (January 2017)

In August 2018 Ethical Consumer searched the Google website but could find no evidence of a policy on toxic chemicals such as PVC and brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Ethical Consumer felt this was necessary as the company produced a tablet computer. As a producer of electronics Ethical Consumer believed this policy was a necessary part of the company's Corporate Social Responsibility reporting. Due to a lack of policy the company received Ethical Consumer's worst rating in this category and lost a whole mark under the Pollution and Toxics category.

Reference:

www.google.co.uk (April 2017)