In October 2018 Ethical Consumer viewed Google’s Environment Sustainability Report 2018.

The report included environmental information, and data on energy, waste, water, greenhouse gas emissions and toxics. Google was thus felt to have a reasonable understanding of its environmental impacts.

There were many targets in the report but all of them were either dated in the past, were vague and not quantified, or were for simply maintaining things at the current level.

Data for greenhouse gas emisssions for Scope 1-3 was said to be independently verified and a link was provided to a statement by Cameron Cole. However the rest of the report did not appear to be independently verified.

Overall Google received Ethical Consumer’s worst rating for environmental reporting.

Reference:

2018 report (22 October 2018)

Ethical Consumer viewed the updated Greenpeace Report ‘Clicking Clean: who is winning the race to build a greener internet?’ dated January 2017.

The Clicking Clean reports benchmarks the IT sector, ranking IT companies on their use of renewable and dirty energy within their data centres. According to the 2017 report the IT sector was estimated to consume about 7% of the world’s global electricity and was predicted to increase threefold in global internet traffic by 2020, resulting in the internet's energy footprint rising further, fueled both by our individual consumption of data and by the spread of the digital age to more of the world's population.

Vevo received an ‘F’ grade in the 2017 Clicking Clean Report. The report stated "Vevo.com, a music video streaming service, appears to use both Rackspace and Amazon Web Services to host its content."
Energy Transparency: Vevo did not provide any information about its energy footprint.
Renewable Energy Commitment: Vevo had not set any renewable energy goals or adopted a long-term
commitment to be renewably powered.
Efficiency and GHG mitigation: Vevo had not provided any evidence about increased energy efficiency.
RE procurement: Vevo had not offered evidence of renewable energy procurement.
Advocacy: Vevo had not provided any evidence of renewable energy advocacy.

As a result of its rating it lost half a mark under Ethical Consumer's Climate Change category.

Reference:

Greenpeace Click Clean Report update (January 2017)

In January 2017 Ethical Consumer viewed the updated Greenpeace Report ‘Clicking Clean: who is winning the race to build a greener internet?’ dated January 2017.

The Clicking Clean reports benchmarks the IT sector, ranking IT companies on their use of renewable and dirty energy within their data centres. According to the 2017 report the IT sector was estimated to consume about 7% of the world’s global electricity and was predicted to increase threefold in global internet traffic by 2020, resulting in the internet's energy footprint rising further, fueled both by our individual consumption of data and by the spread of the digital age to more of the world's population.
Google received an ‘A’ grade in the 2017 Clicking Clean Report.
Greenpeace said "Google took several significant steps forward since our last report toward a renewably powered Google Cloud, building on its strength of advocacy and renewable procurement, but also improving its renewable energy deployment in new markets to keep pace with its rapid growth. Google still has significant room to improve in regards to transparency, however, lagging behind Apple, Facebook and Switch in providing facility level energy demand data."
Transparency (B): The report stated Google’s energy transparency had improved slightly over the past year. "It now reported location specific PUE data as well as very basic data on its colocation footprint, along with a breakout of its energy footprint on a regional basis. However it did not provide energy demand or energy mix at a facility or even for regional locations of its cloud platform(Google Computer Platform, GCP), making it difficult for customers to make informed decisions on whether to choose GCP and in which location."
Renewable Energy Commitment & Siting Policy (A): The report stated "Google strengthened its commitment to becoming 100% renewably powered in a number of important ways over the past year, including a clear articulation of the principles and criteria it follows to increase its supply of renewable energy, including a strong additionality component. Google has improved on synchronizing its plans for expansion with the ability to make progress on its renewable energy goals."
Energy Efficiency & GHG Mitigation (A): The report stated "Google announced a near term goal of tripling the amount of renewable energy it purchases by 2025, growing from its already significant 1.1GW to over 3GW.134 Google in the past year has increased its transparency for driving improvements in energy efficiency in its data centers, including the use of machine learning to optimize data center operations and drive significant gains in energy efficiency. Google also became a contributing member of the Open Compute Project."
RE Procurement (A): The report stated that "Google has been extremely active in the past year purchasing renewable energy for its operations, with nine additional renewable energy contracts executed since our last report."
Advocacy (A): The report stated "Google continues to set the bar for clean energy advocacy within the sector, actively engaging in important policy debates across the jurisdictions of its rapidly growing infrastructure. Google has been particularly active in its support of the US EPA’s Clean Power Plan, providing comments encouraging the EPA to increase its support of renewable in the implementation of the plan. Google has also been very active at the state level in the U.S., particularly in the Southeast, where it has played an important role both in defending existing renewable policies from attack, as well as expanding utility investment and access to renewables in monopoly utility markets like Georgia. Google has also been active in supporting the strengthening of renewable energy markets in the EU, and has provided seed funding to support the establishment of renewable energy tracking programs in Taiwan and other parts of Asia."

Reference:

Greenpeace Click Clean Report update (January 2017)

In November 2015 Ethical Consumer viewed the Climate Count's website http://www.climatecounts.org. The organisation is a nonprofit organisation launched in collaboration with Clean Air-Cool Planet and annually rates companies on the basis of their voluntary action to reverse climate change. Climate Counts use a 0-to-100 point scale and 22 criteria to determine if companies had:
* MEASURED their climate "footprint"
* REDUCED their impact on global warming
* SUPPORTED (or suggest intent to block) progressive climate legislation
* Publicly DISCLOSED their climate actions clearly and comprehensively

According to the report Google was "soaring" and had shown expectional leadership but there was still room for improvement.

Google's scorecard stated the following:
Review: 19/22 points. Google had started to measure the companywide impact it had on global warming (i.e., its greenhouse gas emissions or climate footprint).
Reduce: 31/56 points. Google had started to measure the companywide impact it had on global warming (i.e., its greenhouse gas emissions or climate footprint).
Policy Stance: 8/10 points. Google had distinguished itself by strongly advocating for comprehensive public policy that addresses climate change and would lead to market-wide reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and the growth of renewable energy capacity.
Report: 6/12 points. Google had made some public information available on its companywide efforts to address global warming.

Due to the fact Google was grade A it was considered to have a positive policy towards climate change therefore it did not lose any marks under Ethical Consumer's rating system.

Reference:

Climate counts 2015 (23 November 2015)

In August 2018 Ethical Consumer searched the Google website but could find no evidence of a policy on toxic chemicals such as PVC and brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Ethical Consumer felt this was necessary as the company produced a tablet computer. As a producer of electronics Ethical Consumer believed this policy was a necessary part of the company's Corporate Social Responsibility reporting. Due to a lack of policy the company received Ethical Consumer's worst rating in this category and lost a whole mark under the Pollution and Toxics category.

Reference:

www.google.co.uk (April 2017)

In August 2018 Ethical Consumer viewed Google's website for the company's conflict minerals policy.

Google's SEC filing form SD for the year ended 2017 was viewed as well as its pubicly available policy on its website (https://abc.xyz/investor/conflictminerals/).

1. Company's commitment - the company articulated its commitment through its publicly available policy on its website. "We believe it is essential to establish validated, conflict-free sources of 3TG within the Covered Countries so that these minerals can be procured in a way that contributes to economic growth and development in the regions. We believe a widespread withdrawal from trade with the Covered Countries by US companies should be avoided."

2. Conflict-free initiatives - Google had been a member of the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative since 2013; it had supported the Solutions for Hope Gold initiative in 2014 and in 2015, Google joined the Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade.

3. Supplier contracts - Under the Google Supplier Code of Conduct, Google expects its suppliers to perform due diligence on the source and chain of custody of minerals used in the manufacturing of products they supply.

4. Process - Google stated that its due diligence measures were designed in accordance with the framework set forth in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (“OECD”) Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas, Third Edition, 2016 (“OECD Guidance”), and the related Supplements for 3TG.

5. Commitment to sourcing from audited smelters - Google stated "We expect our suppliers to source 3TG from conformant conflict-free smelters such as those audited through the RMI's RMAP(http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org), perform due diligence on the source and chain of custody of the 3TG used in our products, and provide their due diligence measures to us upon request."

6. List of smelters - Google listed its smelters at the end of its SEC Form SD.

Overall Google Inc received a best Ethical Consumer rating for conflict minerals policy.

Reference:

Generic Hoovers ref 2018 (2018)