In August 2019 Ethical Consumer received a response from Oxfam. Regarding its environmental reporting it stated two documents were referred to.

1. Oxfam Annual Report & Accounts 2018
This stated that it was committed to reducing emissions stating that: "In 2014, we set an absolute carbon reduction target of 30% (from our 2011/12 baseline) for our building energy in shops and our transport logistics to be achieved by 2020."

2. Ethical and Environmental Policy (July 2018)
This applied to suppliers and stated that "its suppliers are not only expected as a minimum to comply with all applicable legislation and statutory requirements but also to demonstrate commitment to meet the following standards."
The following standards included: climate change, waste, materials, packaging, wood and forest products, energy, transport, conservation of biodiversity and water.

While Oxfam was considered to have demonstrated a reasonable understanding of its environmental impacts neither documents contained any environmental targets. As a result Oxfam received Ethical Consumer's worst rating for environmental reporting."

2. Ethical and Environmental Policy (July 2018)
This applied to suppliers and stated that "its suppliers are not only expected as a minimum to comply with all applicable legislation and statutory requirements but also to demonstrate commitment to meet the following standards."
The following standards included: climate change, waste, materials, packaging, wood and forest products, energy, transport, conservation of biodiversity and water.

While Oxfam was considered to have demonstrated a reasonable understanding of its environmental impacts neither documents contained any environmental targets. As a result Oxfam received Ethical Consumer's worst rating for environmental reporting.

Reference:

Email to Tim (23 July 2019)

In 2019 Ethical Consumer received a response to a clothing questionnaire sent to Oxfam. This stated that Oxfam,

" Oxfam’s range of cotton products consists of socks (approximately 25%) and bags/homewares (approximately75%). These cotton products represent approximately 15% of our total sales in the range. We do not sell any new clothing items beyond socks and bags as we feel this would detract from our core offering of donated clothing.

The majority of our products made from cotton are in our homewares range. These are all made from recycled cotton materials from WFTO-certified producer groups. Our sock supplier is a member of the ETI and upholds the principles of the base code as well as our own Ethical and Environmental Policy. The cotton bags and homewares we sell are either WFTO or Fairtrade (FLO), GOTS certified or 100% recycled fabric where possible.

We do not currently have a policy explicitly forbidding the use of cotton from Uzbekistan, and while Fairtrade might approve a Fairtrade supplier from this region, they do not currently have any active cotton producers in this region.

We use organic cotton wherever possible, however this is dependent on its availability to the producer groups that we work with."

As the company was selling some non organic cotton and could not be sure it was not sourced from Uzbebkistan the cmpany receievd Ethical Consumer's middle rating for cotton sourcing.

Reference:

Email to Tim (23 July 2019)

In 2019 Ethical Consumer received Oxfam's questionnaire this stated that the company did not have a policy on toxics. As the company sourced a number of products (not just a second hand range) it was marked down in the pollution and toxics category.

Reference:

Email to Tim (23 July 2019)

In August 2018 Ethical Consumer searched the Oxfam website, www.oxfam.org.uk, and found that the company sold second hand vinyl LPs, which are made with PVC. This material had been criticised by environmental campaign groups such as Greenpeace the for its negative environmental impact in production, use and disposal.
Oxfam did not lose additional marks under pollution and toxics as the company was not involved in the sourcing of the products and only sold them due to the fact they have been donated.

Reference:

www.oxfam.org.uk (11 September 2018)

In August 2018 Ethical Consumer viewed Oxfam's website for the organisation's wood and timber sourcing policy.
Two documents were viewed Ethical and Environmental Policy (July 2018) and GFTN-UK Forest Product Reporting Summary for 2013.
Oxfams policy covered all timber and timber-derived products. It also included clauses excluding illegal timber and a preference for certified sources. The company stated that it also used recycled wood / paper.
While Oxfam had provided a report from the WWF's Global Forest and Trade Network, Ethical Consumer viewed GFTN's current members and Oxfam was not listed. The report on its website dated 2013 stated that it used 60% of certified paper / timber however no updated figure was provided.
Without membership to GFTN and no recent figures provided on certified timber usage, Oxfam received a middle Ethical Consumer rating for its timber sourcing policy.

Reference:

Questionnaire (29 August 2018)