In March 2020, Ethical Consumer received a completed questionnaire from Organii Ltd, which contained a question on the company's environmental policy. The company stated that it did not have a published environmental policy, but that "all manufacturing and distribution is outsourced to ethically minded companies who have been independently audited and certified to the organic standards."

The company was considered to be providing environmental alternative products: it only sold certified natural and organic products.

Due to the fact the company had a turnover of less than £10.2 million and was considered to be providing an environmental alternative it received an exemption under Ethical Consumer's Environmental Reporting category.

Reference:

Ethical Consumer questionnaire responses (2020)

In April 2020, Ethical Consumer viewed the Pravera website for information about the company’s policy around microplastics. The company’s FAQs webpage stated that Pravera’s products were free from “Petroleum ingredients”. This was considered to be a positive policy addressing microplastics and non-biodegradable liquid polymers as both were derived from petroleum.

According to Beat the Microbead, there are more than 500 known microplastics ingredients that can be found in our personal care products such as toothpastes, face washes, scrubs and shower gels. They are tiny plastic particles that are added for their exfoliating properties, but sometimes purely for aesthetic purposes only.

According to a recent report by Code Check, non-biodegradable liquid polymers were also prevalent across a wide range of cosmetic products. Like microplastics, these materials degrade with a similar difficulty in the environment and may cause similar harm.

In 2018, the UK government banned the use of microbeads in toothpastes, shower gels and facial scrubs. However, some products classified as “leave on” were not subject to the ban, this would include lotions, sun cream and makeup, as well as abrasive cleaning products. This ban did not extend to non-biodegradable liquid polymers.

Reference:

pravera.co.uk (2020)

In March 2020, Ethical Consumer searched Pravera's website and found that it sold cotton products (such as cleansing wipes) under some of its own brands. The website of the brands showed that it only sold organic certified cotton.

According to Anti-Slavery international (ASI) website viewed by Ethical Consumer in August 2018, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan were two of the world’s largest exporters of cotton, and every year their governments forcibly mobilised over one million citizens to grow and harvest cotton. As it was believed at the time of writing that organic cotton was not grown in Uzbekistan, Orkla was considered to have a positive policy addressing this workers' rights issue.

The Organic Trade Association website, www.ota.com, stated in July 2018 that cotton covered roughly 2.78% of global arable land, but accounted for 12.34% of all insecticide sales and 3.94% of herbicide sales. As the company appeared to only source organic cotton, it was considered to have a positive policy addressing this pollution and toxics issue.

According to the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications (ISAAA), a non-profit pro biotech organisation, genetically modified cotton accounted for 80% of cotton grown in 2017. As the company appeared to only source organic cotton, it was considered to have a positive policy addressing this genetic engineering issue.

Reference:

pravera.co.uk (2020)

In March 2020, Ethical Consumer received a completed questionnaire from Organii Ltd, which contained a question on the company's use of the chemicals triclosan, parabens and phthalates.

Some forms or uses of these chemicals were banned or restricted in the EU or the USA.
Triclosan is an antibacterial and a suspected endocrine disruptor. Parabens are also endocrine disruptors and have been linked to breast cancer. They are used as preservatives. Phthalates, usually DEP or DBP, are used in fragrances and are endocrine disruptors.

The company stated it did not use any of these substances. This was considered a positive policy on toxic chemicals.

Reference:

Ethical Consumer questionnaire responses (2020)

In March 2020, Ethical Consumer received a completed questionnaire from Organii Ltd, which contained a question on the company's policy on the use of palm oil and derivatives in its products.

The company stated that it did not use crude palm oil or palm kernel oil, but did use palm oil derivatives. However, it stated that it did not have the information as what proportion of the palm oil derivatives it used were certified organic or certified by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO).

The company gave the following explanation: "We do not own the formulas for ORGANii products and this information had not been declared by the formula owner, however neither crude palm nor palm kernel are used in the formulas."

As the company sold products containing palm oil derivatives, but it was not known what proportion was sustainably sourced, it received Ethical Consumer's worst rating for its palm oil policy.

Reference:

Ethical Consumer questionnaire responses (2020)