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In January 2021, Ethical Consumer searched the Bosch global website for information on the Bosch Group and Bosch’s Sustainability Report 2019: Factbook was found which was published in 2020.
It stated the following dated and quantified targets:
"Our sites worldwide will be climate neutral before the end of 2020. From develop-ment to production and administration, Bosch will no longer have a carbon footprint from then on. That’s an ambitious goal. But we are in no doubt that we can reach it. In fact, we can already look back at some initial prog-ress: all Bosch sites in Germany have been climate neutral since 2019. Our climate goal refers to the energy we generate ourselves and the volume we purchase for manu-facturing and administration (scopes 1 and 2 of the Greenhouse Gas Protocol, GHG) through energy efficiency, new clean power generation, purchasing green electricity and carbon offsets.
Throughout our supply chains and in the use phase of our products, we aim to reduce our absolute CO2 emissions by at least 15 percent by 2030. Our climate targets have been reviewed and approved by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi). We are the first automotive supplier worldwide to join the SBTi."
Our goal is to reduce absolute water withdrawal at the 61 sites in regions with water scarcity by 25 percent by 2025 compared to 2017.

It gave information on its main impacts including its owns energy use and climate impact, energy use of its products in the use phase, waste, water and toxic chemicals, exceeding statutory requirements for avoiding hazardous substances, the use of recycled and bio-based materials and replacing crude oil-based plastics "in the long term". However, as the company receievd a worst Ethical Consumer rating for its use of Toxic Chemicals it was considered not to have demonstrated a reasonable understanding of its main impacts.

Some carbon data in the Bosch’ report was externally verified but other environmental reporting data did not appear to have been verified.

Bosch Group therefore received a middle rating for environmental reporting.

Reference:

Bosch’s Sustainability Report 2019: Factbook (13 January 2021)

In January 2021, Ethical Consumer searched the Bosch global website for information on the Bosch Group and Bosch’s Sustainability Report 2019: Factbook was found which was published in 2020.
Ethical Consumer was looking for the following:

1a) For the company to discuss its areas of climate impact, and to discuss plausible ways it has cut them in the past, and ways that it will cut them in the future:
The Bosch’ report stated that the company would be climate-neutral in its own operations by 2020 (scope 1 and 2) through energy efficiency, new clean power generation, purchasing green electricity and carbon offsets and added a decarbonisation goal of a 15% reduction by 2030 in scope 3 purchased goods and logistics and use of products sold (seemingly from a 2018 baseline).

It disclosed previous year’s carbon emissions alongside current year - 1,943,000 tons in 2019; 3,259,000 metric tons of CO2e in 2018. The 2019 figure represented “emissions after deducting offsets”.

1 b) For the company to not be involved in any particularly damaging projects like tar sands, oil or aviation, to not be subject to damning secondary criticism regarding it’s climate actions.
The company did supply car parts and was implicated in the 2015 VW diesel emissions scandal. Plus there was no mentions of HFCs that are used in its heat pumps and fridges.

2. For the company to report annually on its scope 1&2 greenhouse gas emissions (direct emissions by the company).
The report included emission data for scope 1 and 2, not for scope 3

3. and to go some way towards reporting on its scope 3 emissions (emissions from the supply chain, investments and sold products).
It did not report on scope 3 but it had a decarbonisation goal of a 15% reduction by 2030 in scope 3 purchased goods and logistics and use of products sold (seemingly from a 2018 baseline).

4. For the company to have a target to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions in line with international agreements (counted as the equivalent of at least 2.5% cut per year in scope 1&2 emissions), and to not count offsetting towards this target.
The Bosch’ report stated that the company would be climate-neutral in its own operations by 2020 (scope 1 and 2) and added a decarbonisation goal of a 15% reduction by 2030 in scope 3 purchased goods and logistics and use of products sold (seemingly from a 2018 baseline). Its final target was to ensure that its full value chain would be climate neutral by 2050. The targets were approved by SBTi, which made them in line with international agreements. But it said it would partly achieve carbon neutrality by using carbon offsets.

Because of the car industry and HFCs involvement, Bosch could not get a middle rating and therefore received Ethical Consumer's worst rating for carbon management and reporting and lost a whole mark under Climate Change.

Reference:

Bosch’s Sustainability Report 2019: Factbook (13 January 2021)

In Janaury 2021 Ethical Consumer searched the Bosch website, www.bosch.com, and its Sustainability Report 2019 for the company's policy on the use of potentially hazardous chemicals such as PVC, BFR and phthalates. No information was found.

A toxics policy was deemed necessary for all companies manufacturing electronic appliances, as these substances were widely used in this sector and had a significant negative environmental impact when released after disposal. A strong policy on toxics would include publicly disclosed data on the use of hazardous chemicals such as PVC, BFR and phthalates; as well as clear, dated targets for ending their use.

Robert Bosch GmbH had no policy and therefore received Ethical Consumer's worst rating in this category and lost a whole mark under Pollution and Toxics.

Reference:

Bosch’s Sustainability Report 2019: Factbook (13 January 2021)

In January 2021 Ethical Consumer viewed Robert Bosch GmbH website, www.bosch.com, in search of the company's conflict minerals policy. Bosch has a US subsidiary but as a private company it is not required to report to SEC under the Dodd Frank Act. It found Bosch Group Policy for Conflict Raw Materials, dated May 2019.

It stated:
* Bosch joined the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) in 2014
* We demand from our suppliers respect and compliance with existing legal requirements concerning the mining of raw materials in conflict and high-risk territories
* Bosch does not directly source any of these minerals from mines in the high-risk territories or elsewhere
* Bosch supports the approach of validating smelters and refiners for 3TG as they play a key role in the supply chain from the mining site to the final product.
* Bosch respects the OECD’s “Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas.”
* We ask our respective suppliers to report the origin and the certification status of the smelters and refiners involved. We regularly report the outcome of our data collection and analysis of the certification status. * Relevant suppliers and sub-suppliers are asked to collaborate with smelters and refiners that are conformant with the Responsible Minerals Assurance Process (RMAP) by RMI. The RMAP identifies smelters and refiners that can verify that their raw materials do not originate from suppliers contributing to conflicts in the high-risk areas. We also highly encourage our suppliers to participate in the RMI or similar relevant industry initiatives with the intention to improve the conditions in the extractive industry.

Conflict minerals are minerals mined in conditions of armed conflict and human rights abuses, notably in the eastern provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The minerals in question are Tantalum, Tin, Tungsten and Gold (3TG for short) and are key components of electronic devices, from mobile phones to televisions.

Ethical Consumer deemed it necessary for any company manufacturing electronics to have a policy on the sourcing of conflict minerals. Such a policy would articulate the company's commitment to conflict free sourcing of 3TG minerals and its commitment to continue ensuring due diligence on the issue. The policy should also state that it intends to continue sourcing from the DRC region in order to avoid an embargo, which would hurt local workers even more.

A company should also:
- support conflict free initiatives in the region
- require conflict minerals policies throughout its supply chain
- explain its due diligence procedures
- use established conflict minerals reporting templates
- commit to only using 3TG minerals from smelters that have been audited and verified as conflict free, ideally listing them

Since Robert Bosch GmbH had some of these things but did not state its commitment to continue to source from the DRC region, it received Ethical Consumer's worst rating for conflict minerals and lost a full mark under Human Rights and Habitats and Resources.

Reference:

www.bosch.com (23 May 2011)